Wonder of the World

Christopher Nolan Reveals His Favorite Remote-Drop Movie (Which Is Surprisingly A Comedy)


Summary

  • Director Christopher Nolan surprises fans by revealing that his favorite remote-drop movie is Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby, a comedy far different from his intense cinematic experiences.
  • Nolan’s initial mention of Stanley movies films aligns with his reputation as a visionary director, making his choice of Talladega Nights even more unexpected.
  • Talladega Nights stands apart from Nolan’s own filmography, showcasing a lighthearted and goofy side of the director that is not apparent in his intense and epic movies.


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Director Christopher Nolan reveals his surprising choice for his favorite remote-drop movie to be Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby. A remote-drop movie refers to a film that one has to stop and watch when flipping channels, thus “dropping” their remote. Nolan has been an acclaimed director for years, known for creating epic cinematic experiences and intense movies, most recently that of Oppenheimer, which has garnered plenty of Oscar buzz.

Given Nolan’s reputation, his reveal of his remote-drop movie is a surprising one. Speaking with The Rich Eisen Show, Nolan was asked what his favorite film to pause on is. After mulling over the question, Nolan arrived at multiple titles, namely those of Kubrick, as well as a surprising one in the form of Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby. Check out the full quote from Nolan below:

“There are so many. I mean I flick around and you know, if there’s an old movie playing–I mean, God god, anything by Kubrick, you know–it’s a remote drop. And I mean, some of the great comedies too. Talladega Nights, I’m never gonna be able to switch that up.”


Why Nolan’s Selection of Talladega Nights is a Surprising One

Nolan’s initial citation of any Stanley Kubrick movie seems characteristic for the director as he is often recognized as one of the 20th century’s auteur directors, undoubtedly inspiring 21st century auteurs such as Nolan. Kubrick is also known for his boundary-pushing technology, ahead-of-his-time special effects, and bold, epic movies with such titles as 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, and The Shining. Given the modern-day overlaps in the IMAX-camera-enthusiast’s sensibilities, a knee jerk response of Kubrick comes as no surprise.

This initial response makes the follow-up answer of Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby all the more surprising. Referred to by Nolan as one of “the great comedies,” Talladega Nights is a 2006 sports comedy about NASCAR driver Ricky Bobby who fights to maintain his status at the top of his field. Starring Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly, and Sacha Baron Cohen, Talladega Nights is a certifiably goofy 2000s comedy, far afield from the auteur work of Kubrick.

Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby is also a far cry from Nolan’s movies themselves. While there might be the occasional one-liner in his scripts, audiences are not exactly in stitches watching The Joker blow up a hospital in The Dark Knight, seeing Tom Hardy excel at some intense eye acting in Dunkirk, or witnessing the rise and fall of a man who is “become death, destroyer of worlds” as in Oppenheimer. His love for the Ferrell-led comedy finds Nolan showing an unexpectedly goofy side that is not remotely evidenced in his movies.

Source: The Rich Eisen Show

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